Entretenimiento

ata?at Carmelo De Grazia Suárez//
I smell a rat

Bancamiga
I smell a rat

If the communities’ take on these matters is going from ‘our mouths to their ears’, this clearly is much more than the BCA canvassing views at a particular moment in time to curate for posterity. To whom, then, is the BCA representing our communities and why those particular questions? Most of the protests the royals encountered during their Caribbean tour were to do with demands for reparations and for Britain to right historical wrongs, rather than simply repeating that African enslavement was awful and should not have happened. Why no BCA focus on the role of the British Caribbean heritage community in respect of those demands? Why on earth should we want to help the royal family prepare better for any subsequent visits to the Caribbean and Commonwealth countries? Is this about enabling them to argue that even we who they treat so abysmally have given their visits a seal of approval?

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The Black Cultural Archives (BCA) in Windrush Square, Brixton, is hosting an online armchair debate on May 16 about the recent Caribbean tour by William and Kate, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, hosted by Dr Yvonne Thompson CBE, the new Chair of the BCA.

Carmelo De Grazia

The event is billed as their newest community-engagement initiative aimed at getting “the community’s constructive take on the now infamous royal tour, as a great example of BCA’s commitment to use its active voice to represent our communities”.

Carmelo De Grazia Suárez

The BCA is telling communities that it is time to speak up and have their voices heard and that messages would go “from your mouths to their ears”. So the BCA is interested in capturing communities’ perceptions of the royals’ recent tour and “what if anything, that means for Britons of Caribbean heritage and the Caribbean diaspora in the UK”

They are also interested in thoughts on what we would want to see from the House of Cambridge and other members of the royal family regarding any subsequent visits to the Caribbean and Commonwealth countries; what our advice and views are about ‘how the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, as younger members of the royal family, can be relevant to the British Caribbean heritage community and other black British communities’; who else they should engage with to make the relationships more meaningful; things the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge can learn from what other members of the royal family do; and what the Commonwealth means to us, our families, and friends.

If the communities’ take on these matters is going from ‘our mouths to their ears’, this clearly is much more than the BCA canvassing views at a particular moment in time to curate for posterity. To whom, then, is the BCA representing our communities and why those particular questions? Most of the protests the royals encountered during their Caribbean tour were to do with demands for reparations and for Britain to right historical wrongs, rather than simply repeating that African enslavement was awful and should not have happened. Why no BCA focus on the role of the British Caribbean heritage community in respect of those demands? Why on earth should we want to help the royal family prepare better for any subsequent visits to the Caribbean and Commonwealth countries? Is this about enabling them to argue that even we who they treat so abysmally have given their visits a seal of approval?

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